Content

Kenya

Student in a training facility for solar technicians and energy auditors at Strathmore University, Nairobi, alongside solar systems

more

Overview

Anchor of stability in East Africa

With annual economic growth of over five per cent, Kenya is an economic powerhouse in East Africa and also plays an important role politically in stabilising the region.

Yet the country faces considerable challenges. There are marked social, economic and regional disparities and over a third of the population lives below the national poverty line. There is high youth unemployment, and rapid population growth of over 2.5 per cent (2017 figures) is making it hard to combat poverty. Kenya ranks 146th out of the 188 countries currently ranked on the Human Development Index (HDI). There is widespread corruption.

Tensions arise regularly between the over 40 ethnic groups living in Kenya, who speak 50 different languages. The situation has been aggravated by the regional conflicts in neighbouring South Sudan and Somalia. Over 400,000 refugees are living in Kenya, mostly in camps in border areas.

Straight to

Development facts and figures on Kenya

  • People on the streets of Nairobi, Kenya
    Political situation

    A polarised society

    Over the last ten years, Kenya has launched some important reforms. It adopted a new constitution in 2010, which sets out a list of basic rights and provides for the restructuring of the country from a central state to a republic with a decentralised structure.

  • An employee inspects an assembly line on which tetrapacks of fruit juice are transported.
    Economic situation

    Sound economic basis

    Kenya is the second largest economy in East Africa, after Ethiopia. In 2017, economic growth was 4.9 per cent, with the World Bank predicting growth would continue at five to six per cent in the next few years.

People on the streets of Nairobi, Kenya
Political situation

A polarised society

Over the last ten years, Kenya has launched some important reforms. It adopted a new constitution in 2010, which sets out a list of basic rights and provides for the restructuring of the country from a central state to a republic with a decentralised structure.

In 2017, elections were scheduled to elect the president, governors and devolved governments. The process was a lengthy one. Presidential elections were held on 8 August. The opposition challenged the result, in which President Uhuru Kenyatta had been confirmed in office. The courts then overturned the election result due to irregularities on the part of the electoral commission and the election had to be re-run on 26 October.

The opposition boycotted the re-run because they did not feel that their demands for the reform of electoral law had been fully met. Only 38 per cent of those entitled to vote went to the polls. A large majority of them voted for Kenyatta. The controversy surrounding the presidential election has severely polarised the country and the opposition still refuses to recognise the election result. The two opposing candidates, Uhuru Kenyatta and Raila Odinga, have, however, reached an understanding with each other, sealed in early 2018 with a symbolic handshake.

An employee inspects an assembly line on which tetrapacks of fruit juice are transported.
Economic situation

Sound economic basis

Kenya is the second largest economy in East Africa, after Ethiopia. In 2017, economic growth was 4.9 per cent, with the World Bank predicting growth would continue at five to six per cent in the next few years.

Agriculture as the most important sector of the economy

Compared with other African states, Kenya has a sound economic basis. It also has a well-trained workforce. Agriculture is the mainstay of the economy, providing a living to around 70% of the population. Kenya's main exports are tea, coffee and cut flowers.

The service industries, particularly the IT sector and the tourism sector, play an important role in the economy. In recent years, however, Kenya has been repeatedly targeted by the Somalia-based terrorist organisation, Al-Shabaab. The fragile security situation has hit tourism especially hard.

East African Community

Kenya is a founding member of and a driving force behind the East African Community (EAC), to which Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi also belong. Since 2010, these five countries have maintained a common market, with free movement of goods and persons for the over 130 million inhabitants living within their borders. The EAC's long-term goal is political union, with a common currency, along the lines of the EU.

German development cooperation with Kenya

Germany is helping the Kenyan government to facilitate economic growth, achieve sustainable poverty reduction and eliminate social disparities.

At government negotiations in 2016, funds amounting to around 252 million euros were committed to Kenya for the period from 2016 to 2018 – 117.5 million euros of this was for intergovernmental cooperation (92 million euros for Financial Cooperation and 25.5 million euros for Technical Cooperation).

The remaining funds are divided mainly between the special initiative One World – No Hunger, the special initiative "Tackling the root causes of displacement, reintegrating refugees", and loans provided by KfW Development Bank in the energy sector.

The following priority areas of cooperation have been agreed upon with the Kenyan government:

  • agriculture
  • health
  • promotion of youth employment and vocational training.

At the government negotiations in 2016, it was decided to phase out cooperation in the priority area of water and sanitation.

Farmer in the agricultural cooperative Mitooini in Kenya, which increases yields with an innovative irrigation concept.
Priority area "Agriculture"

Strengthening food security and drought resilience

Food security and drought resilience have been an increasing focus of German-Kenyan development cooperation since 2013. With Germany's support, Kenya is endeavouring to make its agriculture sector capable of feeding a growing population despite these periods of drought.

The special initiative "One World – No Hunger"

A Green Innovation Centre – an innovation centre for the agricultural and food sector – has been established in Kenya as part of the BMZ's Special Initiative "One World – No Hunger". It supports the efforts of small farms to increase their production and income on a lasting basis. The focus is on dairy farming and the cultivation of drought-resistant sweet potatoes.

The German government is also assisting the Kenyan government with projects for improving soils, training women in the agricultural sector and also providing funding to the agricultural sector.

Agriculture is the single most important sector of the Kenyan economy, accounting for some thirty per cent of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Indeed, since many small farmers produce only for their own consumption, the informal agricultural sector probably plays an even larger role in the country's economic and social development.

Arid lands make up 70 per cent of the country. The north and north-west in particular are frequently hit by drought. Kenya's government is currently not capable of precluding the far-reaching consequences of an unpredictable climate and affording its population effective long-term protection from emergencies. This is why food security is one of the Kenyan government's four main goals.

Taking blood samples in a hospital
Priority area "Health"

Improving health provision

The aim of German development cooperation in this sector is to improve access for the poor and disadvantaged to high-quality basic health care.

Since Kenya's health ministry has so far not fully investigated a case of large-scale corruption, thus casting doubt on its willingness to undertake reforms, cooperation in this area is severely restricted.

Kenya’s healthcare system has serious shortcomings. This is evident when one looks at the high rate of maternal mortality, for example. In Kenya, 510 mothers died for every 100,000 live births in 2015 (in Germany, the figure was 6 deaths per 100,000 live births).

Although basic health care is theoretically free, the costs of falling ill can prove financially ruinous for most Kenyans. Only about 20 per cent of the population has any form of health insurance. A sound social health insurance system is therefore badly needed. In cooperation with the WHO, Kenya now plans to introduce universal health insurance.

A student is testing solar panels on the roof of a training facility for solar technicians and energy auditors at Strathmore University, Nairobi.
Priority area "Employment / vocational training"

Creating opportunities for young people

Kenya has high youth unemployment. A study conducted by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has shown that up to 35 per cent of twenty-year-olds are unable to find work. Every year, a further 800,00 young people come onto the labour market.

During Minister Müller's visit to Kenya in 2017, the Kenyan-German TVET Initiative (KGTI), supported by 22 partners from the private sector, was launched. In cooperation with Kenya's education ministry, a number of centres of excellence for vocational training will be set up.

The aim of the initiative is for young people to complete a course of vocational training at the centres of excellence that is of relevance to the labour market (high quality and practical applicability). This should reduce unemployment and, at the same time, help to alleviate Kenya's skills shortage.

Employees in the control center of the municipal waterworks in Nyeri, Kenya
Water

Improving access to water and sanitation

Over a third of people in Kenya are not properly connected to the drinking water supply, and around 70 per cent have no adequate sanitation facilities.

That is why Germany's government is supporting Kenya in its efforts to reform the water and sanitation sector. The aim is to make sure that access to clean water and basic sanitation is sustainable and equitable.

It has been agreed with the Kenyan government that cooperation in the water sector will be phased out. The last commitment was made in 2016.

View of the geothermal power station Olkaria in Kenya

Other areas of cooperation

Renewable energies

Expanding energy supply

Kenya derives over 70 per cent of its energy from geothermal sources and hydropower. There is, however, still a shortfall in energy supply. Some 40 per cent of people have no access to energy. Expanding the energy supply is therefore one of the most urgent tasks facing the Kenyan government. Germany is supporting the country in the field of renewable energies and energy efficiency.

Still image from the BMZ film "Kenya: Pioneer in renewable energies"
Good governance

Fighting corruption

One major impediment to Kenya’s development is the widespread corruption – which often goes unpunished – among politicians, police officers and justice personnel. On the Corruption Perceptions Index published in 2017 by the non-governmental organisation Transparency International, Kenya ranks 143rd out of the 180 countries analysed. Germany is supporting measures to fight corruption and improve transparency and accountability.

View of Nairobi, the capital of Kenya
Refugees

Supporting aid for refugees

Kenya is one of the main countries in the region to take in refugees. Currently, more than 470,000 refugees from Somalia and South Sudan are living there, mostly in camps near the border (figures as at July 2018). Germany is using funds from its initiative "Tackling the root causes of displacement, reintegrating refugees" to help its Kenyan partners to improve the lives and prospects of the refugees.

Refugees in front of their huts in the refugee camp Dadaab
Men fill a biogas plant at the Green Innovation Center at the Bukura Agricultural College in Kenya.

Development facts and figures

  Kenya Data for Germany
Country namea16180138 Republic of Kenya Federal Republic of Germany
Capitala16180110 Nairobi, approximately 3.5 million inhabitants Berlin, 3.7 million inhabitants
Surface areaa16180096 580,370 sq km (2017) 357,380 sq km (2017)
Ranking Human Development Index (HDI)a16180124 142 of 189 (2017) 5 of 189 (2017)
http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.SRF.TOTL.K2

Surface area

Surface area is a country's total area, including areas under inland bodies of water and some coastal waterways.

http://hdr.undp.org/en/statistics/

Ranking Human Development Index (HDI)

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) publishes a Human Development Report once a year. The Human Development Index (HDI) contained in the Report records average figures for a country in fundamentally important fields of human development. These include, for example, life expectancy at birth, level of education and per capita income. From a large number of such individual indicators a ranking is calculated. Using this ranking it is possible to establish the average development status of a particular country.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.RUR.TOTL.ZS

Population living in rural areas (% of total)

Rural population refers to people living in rural areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated as the difference between total population and urban population.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.LE00.IN

Life expectancy

Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.POP.65UP.TO.ZS

Population ages 65 and above (% of total)

 

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.POP.0014.TO.ZS

Population ages 0-14 (% of total)

 

http://www.bmz.de/en/index.html

Volume of German development cooperation

Funds for development cooperation (Technical and Financial Cooperation) committed by the Federal Republic of Germany under intergovernmental agreements.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.ODA.ODAT.CD

Total amount of ODA received

Net official development assistance (ODA) consists of disbursements of loans made on concessional terms (net of repayments of principal) and grants by official agencies of the members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), by multilateral institutions, and by non-DAC countries to promote economic development and welfare in countries and territories in the DAC list of ODA recipients. It includes loans with a grant element of at least 25 percent (calculated at a rate of discount of 10 percent). Data are in current U.S. dollars.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.ODA.ODAT.PC.ZS

Amount of ODA received per capita

Net official development assistance (ODA) per capita consists of disbursements of loans made on concessional terms (net of repayments of principal) and grants by official agencies of the members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), by multilateral institutions, and by non-DAC countries to promote economic development and welfare in countries and territories in the DAC list of ODA recipients; and is calculated by dividing net ODA received by the midyear population estimate. It includes loans with a grant element of at least 25 percent (calculated at a rate of discount of 10 percent). Data are in current U.S. dollars.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SN.ITK.DEFC.ZS

Undernutrition

Population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption (also referred to as prevalence of undernourishment) shows the percentage of the population whose food intake is insufficient to meet dietary energy requirements continuously. Data showing as 2.5 signifies a prevalence of undernourishment below 2.5%.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SI.POV.NAHC

Population living below the national poverty line (% of total)

National poverty rate is the percentage of the population living below the national poverty line. National estimates are based on population-weighted subgroup estimates from household surveys.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SI.POV.DDAY

Population living in absolute poverty (% of total)

The percentage of the population living on less than 1.90 US dollars a day at 2011 international prices. The World Bank last changed the definition of this poverty line in October 2015. Previously, it was defined as the percentage of the population living on less than 1.25 US dollars a day at 2005 international prices. Five countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Jordan and Laos) still use this older definition.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRM.CMPT.ZS

Children who complete primary school (% of total)

Primary completion rate is the percentage of students completing the last year of primary school. It is calculated by taking the total number of students in the last grade of primary school, minus the number of repeaters in that grade, divided by the total number of children of official graduation age.

When using this method of calculation the result may be greater than 100 per cent for some countries. This just means that the number of children completing their primary school education in that particular school year was higher than the number of children who were of official school leaving age.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRM.NENR

Proportion of school age children attending primary school

Net enrollment ratio is the ratio of children of official school age based on the International Standard Classification of Education 1997 who are enrolled in school to the population of the corresponding official school age. Primary education provides children with basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills along with an elementary understanding of such subjects as history, geography, natural science, social science, art, and music.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.ADT.LITR.ZS

Literacy rate

Adult literacy rate is the percentage of people ages 15 and above who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.XPD.TOTL.GD.ZS

Public spending on education

Public expenditure on education consists of current and capital public expenditure on education includes government spending on educational institutions (both public and private), education administration as well as subsidies for private entities (students/households and other privates entities).

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SE.PRM.ENRL.TC.ZS

Number of pupils per teacher at primary school level

Primary school pupil-teacher ratio is the number of pupils enrolled in primary school divided by the number of primary school teachers (regardless of their teaching assignment).

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.IMM.IDPT

Immunization, diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT) (% of children ages 12-23 months)

Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.STA.BRTC.ZS

Births attended by skilled health staff (% of total)

Births attended by skilled health staff are the percentage of deliveries attended by personnel trained to give the necessary supervision, care, and advice to women during pregnancy, labor, and the postpartum period; to conduct deliveries on their own; and to care for newborns.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.STA.ANVC.ZS

Pregnant women receiving prenatal care (%)

Pregnant women receiving prenatal care are the percentage of women attended at least once during pregnancy by skilled health personnel for reasons related to pregnancy.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.DYN.MORT

Under-five mortality rate (per 1,000 live births)

Under-five mortality rate is the probability per 1,000 that a newborn baby will die before reaching age five, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.STA.MMRT

Number of mothers who die during pregnancy or childbirth (per 100,000 live births)

Maternal mortality ratio is the number of women who die during pregnancy and childbirth, per 100,000 live births. The data are estimated with a regression model using information on fertility, birth attendants, and HIV prevalence.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.DYN.AIDS.ZS

HIV/AIDS prevalence among the 15-49 age group

Prevalence of HIV refers to the percentage of people ages 15-49 who are infected with HIV.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.XPD.PUBL.ZS

Public health spending as a percentage of gross domestic product

Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IS.ROD.PAVE.ZS

Roads, paved (% of total roads)

Paved roads are those surfaced with crushed stone (macadam) and hydrocarbon binder or bituminized agents, with concrete, or with cobblestones, as a percentage of all the country's roads, measured in length.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IT.NET.USER.ZS

Individuals using the Internet (% of population)

Internet users are individuals who have used the Internet (from any location) in the last 3 months. The Internet can be used via a computer, mobile phone, personal digital assistant, games machine, digital TV etc.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IS.VEH.PCAR.P3

Passenger cars (per 1,000 people)

Passenger cars refer to road motor vehicles, other than two-wheelers, intended for the carriage of passengers and designed to seat no more than nine people (including the driver).

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IT.CEL.SETS.P2

Mobile cellular subscriptions (per 100 people)

Mobile cellular telephone subscriptions are subscriptions to a public mobile telephone service using cellular technology, which provide access to the public switched telephone network. Post-paid and prepaid subscriptions are included.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.H2O.SAFE.ZS

Percentage of the population with sustainable access to safe drinking water

Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SH.STA.ACSN

Improved sanitation facilities (% of population with access)

Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.LND.AGRI.ZS

Land under cultivation (% of total land area)

Agricultural land refers to the share of land area that is arable, under permanent crops, and under permanent pastures. Arable land includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Land under permanent crops is land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee, and rubber. This category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees, and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber. Permanent pasture is land used for five or more years for forage, including natural and cultivated crops.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/ER.LND.PTLD.ZS

Land classified as conservation areas (% of total land area)

Terrestrial protected areas are those officially documented by national authorities.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.LND.FRST.ZS

Forested land (% of total land area)

Forest area is land under natural or planted stands of trees of at least 5 meters in situ, whether productive or not, and excludes tree stands in agricultural production systems (for example, in fruit plantations and agroforestry systems) and trees in urban parks and gardens.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EN.ATM.CO2E.PC

Level of carbon emissions per capita (in tons)

Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EG.USE.ELEC.KH.PC

Power consumption per inhabitant

Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SL.AGR.EMPL.ZS

Jobs in agriculture (% of total)

Employees are people who work for a public or private employer and receive remuneration in wages, salary, commission, tips, piece rates, or pay in kind. Agriculture corresponds to division 1 (ISIC revision 2) or tabulation categories A and B (ISIC revision 3) and includes hunting, forestry, and fishing.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/EG.IMP.CONS.ZS

Energy imports (% of total energy consumption)

Net energy imports are estimated as energy use less production, both measured in oil equivalents. A negative value indicates that the country is a net exporter. Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SL.TLF.0714.ZS

Child labour (% of children aged 7 to 14)

Economically active children refer to children involved in economic activity for at least one hour in the reference week of the survey.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SL.UEM.TOTL.ZS

Unemployment rate

Unemployment refers to the share of the labor force that is without work but available for and seeking employment. Definitions of labor force and unemployment differ by country.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/BX.KLT.DINV.CD.WD

Foreign direct investment, net inflows (BoP, current US$)

Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows (new investment inflows less disinvestment) in the reporting economy from foreign investors. Data are in current U.S. Dollars.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.DOD.DECT.CD

Total foreign debt

Total external debt is debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Total external debt is the sum of public, publicly guaranteed, and private nonguaranteed long-term debt, use of IMF credit, and short-term debt. Short-term debt includes all debt having an original maturity of one year or less and interest in arrears on long-term debt. Data are in current U.S. dollars.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GNP.ATLS.CD

GNI (current US$)

GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro area, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GNP.PCAP.CD

GNI per capita (current US$)

GNI per capita (formerly GNP per capita) is the gross national income, converted to U.S. dollars using the World Bank Atlas method, divided by the midyear population. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro area, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NE.EXP.GNFS.ZS

Exports of goods and services (% of GDP)

Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NE.IMP.GNFS.ZS

Imports of goods and services (% of GDP)

Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/FP.CPI.TOTL.ZG

Inflation

Inflation as measured by the consumer price index reflects the annual percentage change in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/DT.TDS.DECT.EX.ZS

Debt service as percentage of exports of goods and services and net income from abroad

Total debt service is the sum of principal repayments and interest actually paid in foreign currency, goods, or services on long-term debt, interest paid on short-term debt, and repayments (repurchases and charges) to the IMF. Exports of goods and services includes income and workers' remittances.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.IND.TOTL.ZS

Industry, value added (% of GDP)

Industry corresponds to ISIC divisions 10-45 and includes manufacturing (ISIC divisions 15-37). It comprises value added in mining, manufacturing (also reported as a separate subgroup), construction, electricity, water, and gas. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.AGR.TOTL.ZS

Agriculture, value added (% of GDP)

Agriculture corresponds to ISIC divisions 1-5 and includes forestry, hunting, and fishing, as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NV.SRV.TETC.ZS

Services, etc., value added (% of GDP)

Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99 and they include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3.

http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG

GDP growth (annual %)

Annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources

Map of Kenya

This map does not necessarily reflect the official position of the German government in terms of international law.

Further information

Here you can find selected links to websites with more information on development policy in Kenya.

BMZ glossary

Close window

 

Share page